News

  • LPI’s Graebert shared Michigan WalkUp Study Results at Living in Kalamazoo Event

    LPI’s Graebert shared Michigan WalkUp Study Results at Living in Kalamazoo Event

    Nationwide, studies are citing the resurgence of the urban lifestyle, and cities in Michigan are no exception. On Jul. 29, 2015, Southwest Michigan First and partners hosted an event called “Living in Kalamazoo: What’s the Demand?” The purpose of this event was to look at real estate trends and the need for housing in downtown Kalamazoo, how these redevelopment projects can work from a financial standpoint, and what examples currently exist in the city landscape.

  • LPI’s Planning & Zoning Center and MSUE Michigan Citizen Planner Team Up for Training

    LPI’s Planning & Zoning Center and MSUE Michigan Citizen Planner Team Up for Training

    As the MSU Planning & Zoning Center (PZC), a part of the MSU Land Policy Institute, gears up for its 8th annual Zoning Administrator Certificate Training Program, it also looks forward to increased partnership with MSU Extension’s (MSUE) Michigan Citizen Planner Program. The Zoning Administrator Certificate training is recommended for all new and current Zoning Administrators, along with private consultants and county planners who consult with local Zoning Administrators. This year, the Training Program will take place in Muskegon at the Shoreline Inn & Conference Center, Feb. 23-25, 2016

  • Do We Have too Many Counties?

    Michigan has 83 counties. California, which is more than twice as large as Michigan and boasts more than three times as many residents, has just 47 counties. Kentucky, with two-thirds of Michigan’s land area and less than half its population, has 120. So what gives? Does Kentucky have too many counties? Or does California have too few?

  • As More People Move Downtown, Kalamazoo Can Take Advantage, Experts Say

    People are moving back to urban areas and downtown Kalamazoo can grow with that trend, a panel of experts said Wednesday. Kalamazoo’s core has great potential for residential development, they said—if public and private sectors can work together.