News

  • Introducing “The WalkUP Wake-Up Call: Michigan Metros”

    Introducing “The WalkUP Wake-Up Call: Michigan Metros”

    Walkable real estate development projects and places are on the rise nationwide. LOCUS has looked at how these trends are playing out in Atlanta, Washington, DC, and Boston. Today, we’re excited to unveil the fourth report in ourWalkUP Wake-Up Call series. The WalkUP Wake-Up Call: Michigan Metros looks at development in seven Michigan metropolitan areas: Detroit-Ann Arbor, Grand Rapids-Muskegon-Holland, Lansing, Jackson, Kalamazoo-Battle Creek, Saginaw-Bay City-Midland, and Flint. Our analysis of these areas finds that in the most recent real estate cycle, 22 percent of all new income property development located in the 2.7 percent of land that is walkable urban. This share of new development is up from only 6 percent in the 1990s real estate cycle and 12 percent from the 2001-2008 cycle.

  • Winners to be announced June 23: Michigan “Missing Middle” Housing Design Competition Awards Symposi

    Winners to be announced June 23: Michigan “Missing Middle” Housing Design Competition Awards Symposi

    Join AIA Michigan, the Competition sponsors and attendees at the 2015 LOCUS Michigan Leadership Summit on Tuesday, Jun. 23, 2015, for the 2015 “Missing Middle” Housing Design Competition Awards Symposium where winning designs and designers will be recognized for their work.

  • Land Policy Institute helps lead urban development study

    Land Policy Institute helps lead urban development study

    The MSU’s Land Policy Institute is helping conduct the Michigan Walkable Urban Places study to assist in planning future development blueprints for the state of Michigan. The study will assess walkability trends and real estate demand in seven metro regions: Detroit-Ann Arbor; Flint; Grand Rapids-Muskegon-Holland; Kalamazoo-Battle Creek; Lansing; Jackson; and Saginaw-Midland-Bay City.

  • Atlanta Region Developing More Walkable Urban Places

    The Atlanta metropolitan area is bucking the trends established by its recent history of sprawling development by building a majority of its new developments as walkable urban places. The Atlanta region is kicking butt with walkable urban developments,” according to a post by Darin, also known as the ATL Urbanist.