News

  • Medical marijuana law training offered

    Michigan State University (MSU) Extension is offering training throughout Michigan for local government officials on the new Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act, and related law.

    Mark Wyckoff, senior associate director of the MSU Land Policy Institute and director of the Planning and Zoning Center at MSU, says of the new laws, “There is no right answer other than communities making an informed choice that works for that community. The training will help communities understand these risks and how to evaluate them.”

    Trainings will be held throughout February and March at 11 locations. The workshops run from 6-9 p.m. and Master Citizen Planners will earn three hours of continuing education credits. The cost is $55, or $50 for Master Citizen Planners or those in groups of two or more from the same municipality. Registration ends Feb. 13.

     

  • MSU Extension offers local government training on new Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act

    MSU Extension offers local government training on new Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act

    Michigan State University (MSU) Extension is offering training throughout Michigan for local government officials on the new Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act, and related law.

    Anytime new laws related to marijuana are passed, it creates questions and some concerns in Michigan communities. MSU Extension’s new training will provide an understanding on all the relevant changes in the act and options about prohibiting or accepting growing operations and dispensaries in communities. . .

    . . .Mark Wyckoff, senior associate director of the MSU Land Policy Institute and director of the Planning and Zoning Center at MSU, says of the new laws, “There is no right answer other than communities making an informed choice that works for that community. The training will help communities understand these risks and how to evaluate them.”

     

     

  • LPI Year in Review

    LPI Year in Review

    This year, the Land Policy Institute (LPI)’s contribution to research and outreach efforts have included such topics as placemaking, economic development, regionalism, legacy cities and land use, among others. The Institute has been working with many units on campus, as well as stakeholders and policy makers in the state and nationwide in support of building and maintaining sustainable communities in Michigan.

    Please visit LPI’s website in 2017 for updates on our research and outreach efforts. Be sure to check out our News Feed and Resources for additional highlights from 2016.

  • What are the benefits of effective placemaking in your community?

    What are the benefits of effective placemaking in your community?

    Effective placemaking techniques can yield a number of benefits for communities of all shapes and sizes when it comes to activating public spaces. Placemaking can be implemented in various places, such as an entire downtown district or a single neighborhood, to improve the local quality of life. These techniques can also be used to help communities attract and retain talent through improving the quality of their key centers, nodes and corridors, and providing a wider range of housing, transportation, entertainment and recreational opportunities.

    Through attracting new talent to the area, placemaking has the potential to increase economic competitiveness by creating jobs to retain these talented workers, which in turn will create a growing tax base and tax revenues that can support the growth of urban services. Increasing these services and bringing in new residents and visitors also makes communities more attractive for developers, since they are likelier to have a higher return on investment. Plus, the increased activity in the area creates an environment that is more favorable for new businesses to open.

    Placemaking can also assist in economic development at the regional level, where regionally significant locations can be targeted for Strategic Placemaking projects, which can lead to their inclusion in regional economic development plans as areas that are priorities for new investment.